Food

I recently accessed MyFitnessPal.com, which allows the user to record what she or he eats every day.  The site details nutrition data for over 1.0 million food and drink choices.

Recording these data (data are plural, not and singular but I’ll prefer plural here) calculates the intake of protein, carbs, fat, cholesterol, Na-Cl, etc.

I posted previously about nutrition intake, and now MFP relatively-accurately determines how well or poorly I am hitting certain daily goals.

If nothing else, the site’s arithmetic makes sense to my strange brain.

Now DK and SAR will dissect that site and post about its inaccuracies and incompleteness.  (Accuracy and completeness are fundamental accounting concepts.  Are the data accurate?  Are they complete?  Good auditors look for both.)

Speaking of accounting and as you likely are aware, I previously worked as a CPA.  One project required that our team work in Sioux Falls, SD, USA.

We lived in a Residence Inn during the work week.

One weekend, I ate dinner with my parents.  My mom asked me how I liked living on the road.  The following conversation ensued:

DA:  “It’s OK.  I get up in the morning, and breakfast is ready.  I work.  I come ‘home’, and someone made my bed, cleaned my room, laundered, and made my dinner.”

Mom:  “Well, Dan, for some, that’s what a marriage is like.”

Dad (without looking up from his plate):  “Not mine ….”

My folks are hilarious.

That out-of-town client ultimately declared bankruptcy and wiped out many hardworking shareholders.   One problem associated with business growth is that if a company loses $1.10 for every $1.00 of gross income, increasing gross income simply results in larger losses.

During the 21st century’s first decade, many companies believed that increasing gross income would increase their stock prices, which was true in many cases.

But for some, they simply lost more and more money, ultimately resulting in bad stuff (technical term).  Add to that shady accounting practices, and Enron and Enron-like messes occurred.

 

Speaking of 2006 and craziness, let’s lighten things up with a little “You May Be Right” from Billy Joel in The Tokyo Dome.  The audio really rocks.  Sounds like Enron singing to the IRS:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUmP-aS0fYM

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4 Comments on “Food”

  1. Point 1: I am an MFP user and I like it. My only criticism of it is the lack of editing. I don’t need 100 entries for “salted butter”, just give me a couple. And the crap that people enter onto that site boggles the mind. Do a search for ‘bud light’ and look at all the non-standardization.

    Point 2: The Grammar Girl says that data can be either singular or plural. It can be singular because it’s a mass noun. You wouldn’t say “Are these bacon yours?” even if you were referring to more than one bacon strip. Where she gets it wrong is that she says it’s a matter of style. I disagree. Data is always singular except when you’re referring to multiple, specific pieces of homogeneous data. “I recorded the stock price of Microsoft every day for a month. My data for the 15th through the 20th are wrong.” Each datum is the same as each other (they’re all stock prices of the same stock), so data should be plural. In the case of MFP, the data, though related, is too different to be treated as anything other than a mass noun.

    Point 3: Regardless of your position on Point 2, your use of the plural verb above is unequivocally incorrect. When you put the word “data” in quotes, you are referring to the word. The word is only one word, so it’s singular. “‘Elephants’ are plural.” Uh, no. The word “elephants” is plural.

    Please let me know if you there are any other grammar issues upon which you’d like me to set you straight. 🙂

    • The DA Blog says:

      I knew you’d come up with something–just didn’t think it would involve my lack of research!!!

    • Uncle Rog says:

      Zounds! Good thing you weren’t around to correct Mr Jinks’ famous (of Dixie, Pixie, and Mr. Jinks cartoon fame) rhyming but ungrammatical lament, “I hate those meeces to pieces!” back in the day. Somehow, “I intensely dislike those mice by the slice.” just wouldn’t have had the same effect… or is it affect?? I’m sure I’ll find out. I’m just an economist. I call ’em the way I see it and if I don’t see it, I make it up….

  2. Oh, and my MFP user name is dkusleika.


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